JULES BIANCHI: Late F1 Driver’s Family Plans Legal Action Over ‘Avoidable’ Death

The family of the late Formula 1 driver Jules Bianchi are planning to sue the Federation Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA), Bianchi’s Marussia team and Bernie Ecclestone’s Formula One Group following his death last year.

The Frenchman, 25, suffered fatal head injuries when his car collided with a mobile crane at the Japanese Grand Prix at Suzuka in October 2014.

“Jules Bianchi’s death was avoidable,” said lawyer Julian Chamberlayne.

The Bianchi family believe the actions of one or more of the three parties may have contributed to the crash.

They claim errors were made in the “planning, timing, organisation and conduct of the race”, which they argue “took place in dangerous conditions during the typhoon season in Japan”.

Bianchi’s father Philippe added: “We seek justice for Jules and want to establish the truth about the decisions that led to our son’s crash.

“We have so many unanswered questions and feel that Jules’ accident and death could have been avoided if a series of mistakes had not been made.”

Bianchi died on 17 July 2015, nine months after he crashed into the recovery vehicle at Suzuka in what was his 34th F1 race.

He was the first F1 driver to die as a result of injuries sustained at a race weekend since Brazilian Ayrton Senna in 1994.

Chamberlayne added: “The FIA Panel Inquiry Report into this accident made numerous recommendations to improve safety in Formula One but failed to identify where errors had been made which led to Jules’ death.

“It was surprising and distressing to the Bianchi family that the FIA panel in its conclusions, whilst noting a number of contributing factors, blamed Jules.

“The Bianchi family are determined that this legal process should require those involved to provide answers and to take responsibility for any failings.

“This is important if current and future drivers are to have confidence that safety in the sport will be put first.

“If this had been the case in Suzuka, Jules Bianchi would most likely still be alive and competing in the sport he loved today.”

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