Rio 2016: Mo Farah Wins 5000m To Achieve ‘Double-Double’

Great Britain’s Mo Farah won his fourth Olympic gold medal as he became only the second man in history to retain the 5,000m and 10,000m titles.

The 33-year-old triumphed in the 5,000m final in Rio to extend his tally as Britain’s most successful Olympic track and field athlete of all time.

Farah won in 13 minutes 3.30 seconds as Scot Andrew Butchart finished sixth.

“It shows I didn’t just fluke it in London. To do it again is incredible. I can’t believe it,” said Farah.

Farah’s was Britain’s 27th gold in Rio and their 65th medal, matching the haul at London 2012.

They surpassed that tally when the women’s 4x400m relay team won bronze in the penultimate track event of the Games.

Farah cemented his place as one of Britain’s greatest athletes with his double success four years ago, but repeating the feat makes him the world’s most successful distance runner in terms of major medals.

“My legs were a bit tired after the 10k. I don’t now how I recovered,” he told BBC Sport.

“I wished for just one medal as a junior. It has been a long journey but if you dream of something, have ambitions and are willing to work hard then you can get your dreams.”

Somalia-born Londoner Farah is now a nine-time global champion, moving him above Ethiopian great Kenenisa Bekele.

He matched the feat of Finland’s Lasse Viren, who completed the long-distance double at the Munich 1972 and Montreal 1976 Olympics.

Farah had already achieved the World Championships ‘double double’, successfully defending his 10,000m and 5,000m titles in Beijing last year.

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